How long is medical school?

Studying medicine is a life-long journey that requires constant studying and updating of ones knowledge to keep up with the latest developments in the field. When students commit to going into the field of medicine they must understand that it’s not just a couple of years of studying, but a commitment to dedicate every week to staying up to date on the latest technologies and discoveries. New and novel research is constantly being carried out in medical and dental field to ensure we provide the best possible medical care to patients.

Medical Degrees in UK

A typical medical degree is five years long in the UK. Upon completion, the UK awards medical graduates with a MBBS degree which is a Bachelor’s degree. Usually the initial years will cover pre-clinical modules. This includes life sciences, autoimmune disease, social bodies, clinical sciences, adipose tissue and metabolism, pharmacy and other soft skills subjects such decision making and critical thinking.

Following the initial 2 years students will have an OSCE exam to test their knowledge in all the subjects. The final 3 years of the degree will focus on the medical disciplines of medicine. Post-graduation, medical doctors will attend 2 years of training as junior doctors before they become fully registered. The 2 years are split into Foundation Year 1 (FY1) and Foundation year 2 (FY2). Post-training, registered doctors can begin their specialisation. Specialisation routes are an extra few years of study that doctors go through in a specific discipline such as paediatrics, gynaecology, microbiology, surgery and so on.

Medical Degrees in Europe

The degrees in Europe are generally 6 years long because they are master’s equivalent and include one year of training as a junior doctor in the 6th year. The best medical universities in Europe teach medicine in English alongside their local medicine courses. These courses attract talented international students from all over the world who come and study medicine or dentistry. The initial years cover the pre-clinics such as basic sciences, Anatomy and Physiology. The students start to have some clinical exposure in third year but they will still learn science subjects such as Microbiology, Pathology, Pathophysiology, Internal medicine, surgery and Pharmacology. In 5th year students will learn medical genetics, ENT for Ear Nose Throat, Neurology, Gynacology, General Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Surgery. The sixth year will include lots of clinical rotations which are carried out in groups.

Students observe the professor while they treat a patient. There will be a language barrier as the patients don’t always know how to speak English hence the professor will translate whatever the patient is saying and explain what is happening to the medical students. Upon completion of the six year degree, student can return to the UK as FY2 doctors as they have already done one year of clinical rotations as part of their 6th year. Students who study medicine in Europe tend to have more confidence after graduation due to having more clinical and practical experience.

Studying medicine is a life-long journey that requires constant studying and updating of ones knowledge to keep up with the latest developments in the field. When students commit to going into the field of medicine they must understand that it’s not just a couple of years of studying, but a commitment to dedicate every week to staying up to date on the latest technologies and discoveries. New and novel research is constantly being carried out in medical and dental field to ensure we provide the best possible medical care to patients.

Medical Degrees in UK

A typical medical degree is five years long in the UK. Upon completion, the UK awards medical graduates with a MBBS degree which is a Bachelor’s degree. Usually the initial years will cover pre-clinical modules. This includes life sciences, autoimmune disease, social bodies, clinical sciences, adipose tissue and metabolism, pharmacy and other soft skills subjects such decision making and critical thinking.

Following the initial 2 years students will have an OSCE exam to test their knowledge in all the subjects. The final 3 years of the degree will focus on the medical disciplines of medicine. Post-graduation, medical doctors will attend 2 years of training as junior doctors before they become fully registered. The 2 years are split into Foundation Year 1 (FY1) and Foundation year 2 (FY2). Post-training, registered doctors can begin their specialisation. Specialisation routes are an extra few years of study that doctors go through in a specific discipline such as paediatrics, gynaecology, microbiology, surgery and so on.

Medical Degrees in Europe

The degrees in Europe are generally 6 years long because they are master’s equivalent and include one year of training as a junior doctor in the 6th year. The best medical universities in Europe teach medicine in English alongside their local medicine courses. These courses attract talented international students from all over the world who come and study medicine or dentistry. The initial years cover the pre-clinics such as basic sciences, Anatomy and Physiology.

The students start to have some clinical exposure in third year but they will still learn science subjects such as Microbiology, Pathology, Pathophysiology, Internal medicine, surgery and Pharmacology. In 5th year students will learn medical genetics, ENT for Ear Nose Throat, Neurology, Gynacology, General Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Surgery. The sixth year will include lots of clinical rotations which are carried out in groups. Students observe the professor while they treat a patient.

There will be a language barrier as the patients don’t always know how to speak English hence the professor will translate whatever the patient is saying and explain what is happening to the medical students. Upon completion of the six year degree, student can return to the UK as FY2 doctors as they have already done one year of clinical rotations as part of their 6th year. Students who study medicine in Europe tend to have more confidence after graduation due to having more clinical and practical experience.